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Fox News: ‘We’re going to keep digging’ into Trump’s Russia ties

Fox News host Shepard Smith spoke on Sunday with Sean Hannity, who questioned whether the media had fully explored the links between Trump and Russian officials.

Smith, who hosts Hannity’s “The Five” on Fox News, said the media is focusing on the “bigger picture” of Trump’s ties to Russia.

Smith said he and Hannity discussed a recent interview Trump had with Russia Today, the state-owned Russian news outlet.

“I asked him, ‘Do you believe in the idea of the Kremlin and Putin and Putin is going to bring democracy to this country?'”

Smith said.

“He said ‘Yes,’ ” Smith continued.

“And he said, ‘And then what?’

I’ve got no choice.’ “

Asked by Hannity whether that meant the media was still digging, Smith replied: ‘Yes, we’re going ’round the clock.

Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion and said he would be vindicated if the investigations are concluded.”

Trump has been accused of colluding with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion and said he would be vindicated if the investigations are concluded.

On Sunday, Trump defended his campaign and his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin.”

If you talk with him, he’s a friend. “

If you talk about it as a business, he’d be bankrupt.

If you talk with him, he’s a friend.

I think we have an outstanding relationship.

I don’t think anybody knows it better than I do.”

Why you shouldn’t be reading all the tweets about your job

Posted March 09, 2020 07:11:36A new study shows that the majority of people will not read the tweets from employers.

In a survey conducted by research firm Ipsos, 41 per cent of respondents said they would be “uncomfortable” reading the content of employers’ social media accounts.

“We are concerned that these types of posts can be misinterpreted, used as a tool to target and bully employees, and are likely to be used to promote a particular agenda,” the study’s author, Dr Andrew Rudge, said.

“In particular, we are concerned about the extent to which they may be used by employers to recruit staff and to target workers for recruitment campaigns.”

“This research is particularly important in light of the widespread use of social media platforms by employers.”

The study surveyed nearly 2,000 Australians between January and April 2020, who were asked how often they read employer social media content.

“Overall, more than half of the respondents said that they were ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ comfortable reading posts,” the Ipsos report said.

The majority of respondents, 61 per cent, said they “would not” read posts from employers with “offensive or disparaging” content.

The Ipsos study also found that 56 per cent were uncomfortable reading tweets from companies with “slight or no negative content”.

“The most commonly used word in this category is ‘slight’, followed by ‘slightly’ or a ‘little’ negative content,” the report said.(ABC News: Ben Brumby)The report also found 61 per a “moderate” level of “slightly” or a “little” negative content, with the majority (60 per cent) of respondents preferring “somewhere in between” to read negative content.

Dr Rudge said this trend was likely to continue as employers continue to use social media to target their workforce.

“There’s a very big demand for this type of information,” he said.”[And] it’s not just about the jobs that employers are trying to target, but also about the workforce they want to hire.”

The Ipsus study found that the “most commonly used” word in the “snowball” category was “snot” (48 per cent), followed by “dismember” (45 per cent).

“This type of ‘snot’ or other type of negative content is used by companies to target employees or recruit people,” Dr Rudge explained.

“The more negative and negative the content is, the more likely it is that it will be read by an employee.”

The findings from the Ipso survey showed that the most common words in the snowball category were “sneeze” (42 per cent); “snail” (37 per cent; “snuff” (34 per cent)), “fuzzy” (32 per cent in the case of the “furry” category), and “sniffing” (30 per cent and “trouble” (24 per cent)).

“Employers use these terms to target individuals, with little regard to whether or not they’re actually referring to a specific individual,” Dr Michael Kinsman, Ipsos research director, said in a statement.

“It’s important that we don’t let this lead us down a path that could negatively impact our employees.”

Topics:work,business-economics-and-finance,employment,employment-organisations,government-and/or-politics,social-media,internet-technology,internet,socialmedia,work,education,industry,employment