The New Zealand Medical Association will vote on a motion to allow digital dissemination of intravital blood tests

The New York-based New Zealand medical association will vote Tuesday on a proposed motion to permit online distribution of intravenous blood tests, the first time that such a move has been adopted in the country.

The motion, introduced by Dr. Anthony Kipman, would allow the public to view and download the tests for free online.

It is opposed by the American Blood Center and the National Association of Blood Centers, which have opposed the measure.

The move was first made public by the New Zealand Herald on Thursday.

Kipmitt has said the move is necessary to improve the safety of blood tests because of the increasing number of people who die from intravitiated bleeding in the United States.

Blood Centers and the American Association of Clinical Laboratory Sciences have opposed a similar proposal to allow the free online distribution in New Zealand.

Kipman told the Herald that while there is no medical benefit in online distribution, the motion would help the country better understand the disease burden it is dealing with.

“We have to start to address that pandemic and to address it in a safe, clinical way,” Kipmen said.

“I am very optimistic about the progress that has been made over the past two weeks in New England and in the South Pacific.”

The proposal has gained widespread attention in the past month as New Zealand has seen the largest number of new infections from the coronavirus, a virus that has spread throughout the United Nations and beyond.