The ‘unofficial’ word that got ‘official’

An Indian word that sounds like a mispronunciation of a word that originated in China has become the official word of the country’s agriculture ministry.

The word, ‘chaiyat’ (literally “to spread”), has been in the news recently for its use by state-run Hindustan Times, the mouthpiece of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, to refer to an Indian official who has been criticized for mispronouncing the word.

Chaiyats are used by Indian bureaucrats and public servants as a tool to disseminate information on how to pronounce the name, the word, or even the place of birth of a person, according to an article published by the Hindustani Times on April 13.

“The government is also looking into the use of the word to convey information, especially about corruption cases and issues of national interest.

This is an issue that has not been covered by the media in recent times,” said a government official.

The official added that while the word was not in use at the time of the article, it is now the official language in the country.

According to the Hindutva-oriented Bharatiyah Janta Party, the ‘Chaiya’ word is the “official word of India’s agriculture department” and “has been used as a verb to convey relevant information since it is the most common form of the official Hindi word used in the field of agriculture.”

This news comes just two weeks after Hindustans Times used the word on a news report.

The newspaper reported that the word is used in Hindi, which is the official state language of India.

In fact, it was the first time in over a decade that the ‘chakiya’ language had been officially adopted by the state of India as a form of official Hindi.

The official language is not the only language used by the government of India in India, but is also widely used in many other parts of the world.

In recent years, the government has been working on an ambitious plan to modernize the country by promoting the use and adoption of Hindi.

According a government statement, the plan aims to make Hindi more easily accessible to the general public, improve efficiency in the delivery of services, improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the delivery system and improve the availability of services to citizens.

The government has also announced plans to introduce a new national language, which it says will be the official national language by 2025.

India has also introduced a new, state-funded Hindi textbook that is currently in print in all of the state’s primary schools.

The news comes after a recent controversy surrounding the word in the national news media over the use by a reporter of the Hindoo news outlet, a mouthpiece for the BJP, to call on the government to “change the name of the Chaiyata.”

In the interview with the Hindoos’ English-language edition of the paper, the reporter said, “The word Chaiya has become a national word.

The government must change the name.”