A review of Hsv-associated pneumonia in patients receiving primary care

Nursing homes are the primary care system for elderly Americans.

This means that a significant proportion of the population is likely to be exposed to Hsv infections during the hospitalization.

However, the risk of infection during the nursing home stay is much lower than during the outpatient setting.

This study provides a review of the prevalence of HvS infection during hospitalization and an overview of how this can impact the nursing care of seniors.

The research team, led by Dr. Susan S. McKeon, MD, PhD, assistant professor of nursing, and Dr. Daniel A. Schmitz, MD and assistant professor, nursing, medical student, and nurse practitioner, evaluated data from the Nurses’ Health Study II.

These data included data on Hsv and Pneumococcus populations in the nursing homes.

They also collected information on patient demographics, Hv-associated pneumococcal infection rates, and the number of hospitalizations.

Results The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, double-blind trial, with an initial enrollment of 3,823 patients.

The study included 2,974 patients who had received at least one of the 6 weeks of hospitalization; 1,824 patients who were discharged home; and 1,000 patients who did not receive hospitalization or discharge.

The primary endpoint was the number and rate of Hvar-associated infection in patients who received at or above the median hospitalization rate of 12.5% or more.

Secondary outcomes included the number, rate, and type of hospital infection.

Overall, the primary outcomes were hospitalization (defined as a non-NICU discharge and/or an ICU admission), hospitalization at least 1 week post-hospitalization, and hospitalization within 24 hours of hospital discharge.

Outcomes measured included hospitalization, the number (number per 100 patient) of patients with Hvar, and rates of HV-associated and P-type pneumonia.

The results showed that patients with more hospitalization during the 6-week trial had an increased rate of P- type pneumonia (hazard ratio [HR], 1.46 [95% CI, 1.07-2.16]).

Patients who were hospitalized had a greater than fivefold increase in the number with P- and Hvar pneumonia (HR, 2.28 [95 % CI, 2, 6.03-5.85]).

Patients with hospitalization had a more than five fold increase in Hv infections (HR 1.85 [95 percent CI, 0.95-2, 7.24-3.06]).

The authors conclude that Hv infection rates were significantly higher in patients with at least 6 weeks hospitalization than in those who were not hospitalized.

Keywords: Hsv, Pneumocystis pneumonia, ICU, Hvar infection, nursing home, patients ages 60 and older, pneumonia hospitalization rates study